LexisNexis® Legal Newsroom
Male development just became a more complex issue, making toxic torts based on endocrine disruptors more difficult to prove

Prior posts have noted that in the arena of toxic torts causation is king. Causation of course depends on the underlying processes. If one cannot show a process or system is disrupted or adversely affected, then causation will not be shown. When addressing issues related to the impacts of so-called endocrine...

The herbicide Atrazine has estrogenic effects and interferes with metamorphosis of frogs

Prior posts have noted various theories, and the support for such, related to the decreasing presence of frogs in riparian habitats. These have included various pesticides and infections from viruses and fungi. Now, Atrazine joins the parade of possibilities. Past research reports have noted evidence...

BPA's fluorinated "twin" may be more of a health threat than BPA

Prior posts have noted in detail the debate over the potential adverse health effects of BPA (e.g., estrogen mimic), with the vast majority of research studies indicating that the Bush Administration FDA was incorrect in down-playing the potential adverse health effects of BPA. BPA appears to alter the...

Can dead zones (hypoxic waters) cause deformities in sexual organs of fish? Interesting study suggests it can.

Prior posts have described the scope and potential causes for the "dead zone" (low oxygen) in the Gulf of Mexico; the zone exists for part of the year, and its scope has been expanding over time. Nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus) from various agricultural operations and waste treatment effluent...

BPA exposure may be underestimated because of laboratory method used

Prior posts have discussed various animal studies that have reported the potential for adverse impacts from BPA exposure, as well as the controversial conclusions of FDA under President Bush in assessing the risk of such exposure to humans. Recently published research suggests that the standard approach...

Another BPA issue -- it may cause undesirable activation of estrogenic genes

Prior posts have followed the debate over BPA and its potential problems. In a recently reported study, researchers have raised a new issue, the activation of estrogen-related genes. Exposure of animal and cell models to doses of BPA below the recommended tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 50 µg...

Steps Are Being Taken by Various Entities to Reduce Consumer Exposure to BPA

Numerous prior posts noted that nearly everyone in the U.S. has low levels of BPA in their body, and have reviewed the animal and laboratory studies which indicate that BPA exposure may have adverse health effects on humans. It has also been noted that recent evidence indicates that the major vector...

Update on BPA Use and Production

The post on March 18, Steps Are Being Taken by Various Entities to Reduce Consumer Exposure to BPA , noted that Campbell's was planning on removing BPA from its soup cans. Other companies are also taking steps to decrease, minimize, or eliminate BPA from their food storage containers. As noted...

FDA Rejects Ban on BPA (Bisphenol A) from Food Packaging

Prior posts have noted the numerous studies involving various animals that have indicated the potential estrongenic effects from exposure to BPA. Prior posts have also noted that the primary vector of exposure is cash register receipts. In 2008, the NRDC petitioned FDA to remove BPA from food packaging...

Another estrogenic substance is identified (BPS, which is related to BPA), and the vector exposes nearly everyone

Prior posts have noted that BPA (an estrongen mimic) is found not only in certain plastics (about which there is much nashing of teeth), but the main vector may very well be thermal cash register receipts. Well, get ready for its cousin, BPS, and the newest vector, paper money. Holy greenbacks, Batman...