LexisNexis Home Products & Services Customer Service Center Company Information Alliance Partners LexisNexis Bookstore Search
LexisNexis - Contstitutional Resources


  Current Subscribers
 
Home > The Constitution > How is the Constitution Amended?

 

The Constitution

What is an amendment?
An amendment to the Constitution is an improvement, a correction or a revision to the original content approved in 1788. To date, 27 Amendments have been approved, six have been disapproved and thousands have been discussed.

How is the Constitution amended?
Article V of the Constitution prescribes how an amendment can become a part of the Constitution. While there are two ways, only one has ever been used. All 27 Amendments have been ratified after two-thirds of the House and Senate approve of the proposal and send it to the states for a vote. Then, three-fourths of the states must affirm the proposed Amendment.

The other method of passing an amendment requires a Constitutional Convention to be called by two-thirds of the legislatures of the States. That Convention can propose as many amendments as it deems necessary. Those amendments must be approved by three-fourths of the states.

The actual wording of Article V is: “The Congress, whenever two thirds of both Houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose Amendments to this Constitution, or, on the Application of the Legislatures of two thirds of the several States, shall call a Convention for proposing Amendments, which, in either Case, shall be valid to all Intents and Purposes, as part of this Constitution, when ratified by the Legislatures of three fourths of the several States, or by Conventions in three fourths thereof, as the one or the other Mode of Ratification may be proposed by the Congress; Provided that no Amendment which may be made prior to the Year One thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any Manner affect the first and fourth Clauses in the Ninth Section of the first Article; and that no State, without its Consent, shall be deprived of its equal Suffrage in the Senate.”

 

 


Would you like to learn more about LexisNexis or any other products?

Contact a Sales Rep
 

Constitution Related Information:
LexisNexis Publisher
Lexisnexis at Nexis.com
LexisNexis at Lexis.com
Executive Branch Documents
Military History & War
Political History
LexisNexis U.S. Serial Set Digital Collection


From the Bookstore
Search for Government and Politics related materials available in the LexisNexis Bookstore:

Enter a Key Word
 

Advanced Search
Search Tips


Legal Academic Corporate & Professional Risk & Information Analytics Government
Terms & Conditions Privacy & Security Products Index Site Map Contact Us
Copyright © 2009 LexisNexis, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.