Foliage on trees might be useful as low-tech pollution sensors

As noted in prior posts, significant lung damage has been associated with the PM2.5 particulates; they are a major health hazard. Additionally, diesel is a significant source of such particulates. Thus, researchers considered potential options for assessing air quality in an inexpensive manner. ...

Inhaled particulates may inflame the brain and cause dementia-like harm in children

Prior posts have noted the significant evidence that particulates, particularly PM 2.5, can cause inflammation of the lungs and blood vessels of the body. These posts have also noted that evidence had been found that very small particulates can travel through arteries and veins. Now, evidence has been...

In a smallish room, body heat draws particles near, enhancing inhalation

Most models involving inhalation of particulates of various sorts (e.g., microbes, pollen, dust, toxins) assume a somewhat even distribution of the particulates in the air that is inhaled. While such an assumption helps to simplify exposure calculations, it is factually inaccurate in some circumstances...

Composition of diesel exhaust varies with engine loading, producing differential health impact characteristics from the emissions

As noted in several prior posts, the study of the impact on diesel exhaust has focused on the PM10 and PM 2.5 profiles of the emissions. Recently, researchers argued that this view is too simplistic, and present an interesting study in support of their view. The researchers analyzed the composition...

Nanoparticles Impair Blood Vessel Function

Prior posts have noted the wide range of materials and consumer products in which nanoparticles are used, and also that nanoparticles can cross the so-called blood-brain barrier. New research, using animal models, suggests that such materials may impair blood vessel function. Researchers exposed rats...