March is "Hurricane Katrina and Catastrophic Loss Month" (more or less) on the Insurance Law Center

March is "Hurricane Katrina and Catastrophic Loss Month" (more or less) on the Insurance Law Center

We’re going to try something a little different in an effort to enrich your experience when you visit the insurance law center. With the assistance of that eclectic group known as the Insurance Law Center Advisory Board (two coverage attorneys, a couple of insurance law professors and a former insurance commissioner) we’ve formulated a list of issues—hot topics if you will—that we think will pique your interest. For the rest of 2008, we’ll feature a regularly changing array of content categories that we hope will encourage you to log on regularly and keep you coming back for more.
 
In the true spirit of Web 2.0, a good amount of our issue-focused content will be offered as free downloads (yes, that’s right, I said free). To access the free stuff you do need to be a registered user—just click on the Sign Up prompt in the far right-hand corner of our site.
 
During each month’s issue focus, we’ll also be featuring excerpts from various publications in the LexisNexis database, podcasts, CLE course material and more. Guest contributions from celebrity bloggers, top cases and top searches tailored to the topic flavor of the month and a panoply of expert commentary will round out the selections that we’ll be making available to you.
 
Since there’s no time like the present, we’ll begin today by turning our attention to catastrophic loss and the legal and coverage fallout from cataclysmic events such as hurricanes, floods, earthquakes and terrorist acts. We chose March for this topic (instead of October when the hurricane winds actually begin to blow) because of the anticipated decisions from the Louisiana Supreme Court in Sher v. Lafayette (ambiguity of flood exclusion) and Landry v. Citizens Property (valued policy law), and from the Fifth Circuit in Broussard v. State Farm (allocation of burden of proof, punitive damages). To find out more about these emerging developments, check out the the podcast that we recorded with coverage expert (and prolific blogger) Dave Rossmiller in our Weekly Wrap Up section. Download the podcast for free and listen at your leisure as Rossmiller discusses the history of these cases, the recent guilty plea of Hurricane Katrina plaintiffs’ attorney Richard “Dickie” Scruggs and his widely read Insurance Coverage Law Blog.
 
Our evil plan is to roll out this topic-focused content a little at a time over the next month. That means you’ll need to continue visiting if you don’t want to miss anything. Here’s some of what you’ll see:
  • Commentary by Associate Dean Jeffrey E. Thomas of the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law on Emerging Issues for terrorism insurance
  • Abstracts from New Appleman on Insurance Current Critical Issues on the insurance implications of global warming
  • Commentary by Carrie Cope on the effect of legislative developments on the P&C market in Florida
  • Commentary by Richard Lewis and Marshall Gilinski on business insurance developments in a post-9/11 world
  • Commentary by Barry Zalma on catastrophic loss practice pointers
  • An abstract of a Judicial Profile about Mississippi federal district court Judge L.T. Senter, Jr., who has presided over literally hundreds of Hurricane Katrina cases

C’mon, you have to admit this is good stuff. And it can only get better as we roll through spring and summer with timely, thought-provoking themes. Next up is bad faith. After that we might tackle life insurance (one of my personal favorites--can you just hear the viatical settlement crowd duking it out?), regulatory issues and compliance (another personal favorite) or perhaps reinsurance.

But it’s not all up to me. The Advisory Board (more about them another time) doesn’t have the final say either. I’m counting on YOU for that. This is Web 2.0 after all—you know, that insanely brilliant effort to use the World Wide Web as a platform where users can control their own data and customize their online lives. So comment. Or email me at karen.yotis @lexisnexis.com. Let me know what you think.
 
And y’all come back now, hear?