Prevailing Employer in Wage Case Can Only Recover Attorneys’ Fees if Claim Was Brought in Bad Faith

 Employers may recall recent publicity in California over the extent to which an employer may recover its attorneys’ fees after prevailing in a wage and hour action. This is because Labor Code section 218.5 on its face provides that the prevailing party in any action brought for nonpayment of wages “shall be awarded” its reasonable costs and attorneys’ fees. Thus, Labor Code section 218.5’s fee-shifting provision on its face applies equally to a prevailing employee and employer. Based on this language, in Kirby v. Immoos, a trial court awarded attorneys’ fees to an employer who prevailed in a wage case alleging, among other things, meal and rest break violations. A California court of appeal thereafter affirmed the employer’s fee award. However, the California Supreme Court ultimately reversed this outcome and held that Labor Code section 218.5 does not apply to meal and rest break claims, reasoning that these claims are not claims alleging “non-payment of wages.” [an enhanced version of this opinion is available to lexis.com subscribers] The Court’s ruling left open the possibility that a prevailing employer could recover attorneys’ fees in certain other types of wage-related actions.

To avoid this result, the California Legislature introduced a bill, SB 462, to amend Labor Code section 218.5 to provide that a prevailing employer may only recover attorneys’ fees if a trial court finds that the employee brought the wage action in bad faith. The legislature recently passed this bill and yesterday California’s Governor signed it into law. With this amendment, it will be even more difficult and rare for a prevailing employer to recover attorneys’ fees in wage and hour actions in California.

Read other articles from the California Labor & Employment Blog.

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