Google Acknowledges Trespass in Photographing Residence but Required to Pay Only $1 in Damages

Google Acknowledges Trespass in Photographing Residence but Required to Pay Only $1 in Damages

As reported by the AP (12/2/2010), Google Inc. has acknowledged trespassing on a Pittsburgh-area residence when it photographed the residence for its Street View service.  The homeowners sued after Google allegedly obtained the photograph by travelling upon a private road marked "No Trespassing." Despite the acknowledgement, the terms of the parties' consent judgement requires Google to pay only $1 in damages to the homeowners.

In March, the Third Circuit reinstated the homeowners' trespassing claim after a Pennsylvania district court dismissed the complaint.

Prior history:

UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE THIRD CIRCUIT

Lexis.com subscribers can view the enhanced version of Boring v. Google Inc., 362 Fed. Appx. 273 (3d Cir. Pa. 2010)

Non-subscribers can use lexisOne's Free Case Law search to view the free, un-enhanced version of Boring v. Google Inc., 362 Fed. Appx. 273 (3d Cir. Pa. 2010)

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE WESTERN DISTRICT OF PENNSYLVANIA

Lexis.com subscribers can view the enhanced version of Boring v. Google, Inc., 598 F. Supp. 2d 695 (W.D. Pa. 2009)

Briefs:

Lexis.com subscribers can view the appellate briefs at Boring v. Google, Inc., 2009 U.S. 3rd Cir. Briefs 2350 (3d Cir.)