OECD Doesn't Want Politics to Interfere with Tax Policy

OECD Doesn't Want Politics to Interfere with Tax Policy

I was wrong. I thought that The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) had shrugged off its cautious, conservative tendencies with the issuance of its February 12 report entitled "Base Erosion and Profit Shifting." After my first read of the 91-page document I believed the OECD was willing, as it said, to think "outside the box."...

But then on Friday my colleague Lee Sheppard reported, from London, the following:

    "Achim Pross of the OECD assured practitioners that the rules would not be materially changed. The OECD's action plan is due for the G-8 meeting in June. Pross wanted a multilateral solution so that members do not overreact to political pressure." ("OECD Base Erosion Project Being Eroded, Tax Notes, April 15, 2013.)


... It now seems to me that the OECD views a large part of its mission as preventing overreach by governments under populist pressure to do something about large corporations not paying tax...

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Of course I could be wrong again. I hope so.

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View Marty Sullivan's opinion in its entirety on the taxanalysts® Blog.

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