SunWolf

Dr. SunWolf was a long-time trial and appellate attorney, now an award-winning social science professor and one of the nation’s leading authorities on the behavior of jurors. Her product line for LexisNexis, including the acclaimed Practical Jury Dynamics2 and Jury Talk (DVD), provides trial attorneys with cutting-edge insights on persuasion, listening, memory, social thinking, voir dire, and group-decision making. Her latest book, God-Thinking, invites new thinking about how every juror’s moral compass affects trial outcomes. To learn more about Dr. SunWolf, visit http://professorsunwolf.com/ and on Twitter as @TheSocialBrain

  • Practical Jury Dynamics2

    Author : SunWolf, J.D., Ph.D.

    Publisher : LexisNexis

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      ISBN: 9781422433430

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      ISBN: 9780327194286

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    Practical Jury Dynamics2
    View a sample of this title using the ReadNow feature

    Practical Jury Dynamics2 combines Practical Jury Dynamics with the 2005 and 2006 supplements (Jury Thinking and Juror Competency, Juror Compassion) and also includes new, valuable material.

    The organization of Practical Jury Dynamics2 is designed to encourage more attention to three neglected parts of a Juror's Trial World, in a three-part sequence:

    * The Bio-physiology of a Juror's Brain (What are a juror's mental tools and limits?)
    * The Social Psychology of a Juror's Perceptions (How does a juror make sense of and evaluate the behaviors of other people?)
    * The Effects of Group Dynamics on a Juror's Vote (What happens when a juror becomes part of a group?)

    Whether you are a trial practitioner or someone simply interested in the mysteries of juries, Practical Jury Dynamics2 will cause you to rethink your assumptions.

    Topics Include:

    * What Really Matters to Deliberating Juries
    * A Juror's TiVo® Mind
    * The Electronic-Mediated Juror
    * Juror Flipping and Regret
    * Thinking Unaware
    * Social Memory Contamination
    * Mars and Venus Deliberate
    * Deadlock Phobia
    * Toxic Forepersons, Bailiffs, Jurors
    * Uncovering a Juror's Prosocial Helping
    * The Velcro® Effect
    * Faulty Norms of Deciding and Deliberating
    * Social Loafing in the Juryroom
    * Why Good Jurors Protect Bad Jurors


    For more information on this title, visit the Practical Jury Dynamics landing page.

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Foreword
    10 Practical Features of this Book

    Prologue
    Forethoughts to the Second Edition

    PART I: STUDYING JURORS
    Chapter 1. KNOWING JURORS
    § 1-1. Three Jury Epiphanies
    § 1-2. The Mystery of Jury Deliberations
    § 1-3. The Problems of Jury Research

    PART II: THE BIO-PHYSIOLOGY OF A JUROR'S BRAIN
    Chapter 2. THE MIND IS A CRAZY QUILT
    § 2-1. The Crowd Living in a Juror's Mind
    § 2-2. How a Juror Becomes Aware of a "Fact."
    § 2-3. Juror Listening and Attention Errors
    § 2-4. Biological Basis for Attention

    Chapter 3. "TRIALS" ARE IN THE BRAINS OF THE BEHOLDERS
    § 3-1. The Influence of Color Perception
    § 3-2. Remembering and Forgetting

    Chapter 4. RIGHT MIND/LEFT MIND? HOW OUR BRAIN'S HEMISPHERES REALLY FUNCTION
    § 4-1. Right Mind/Left Mind
    § 4-2. Regions of the Brain That Process Language

    Chapter 5. FROM JUROR-COGNITION TO JUROR-EMOTION
    § 5-1. The Purpose of Emotions in Human Survival
    § 5-2. Physiology of Jurors' Emotions When They Judge Other People's Behaviors
    § 5-3. How Emotional Arousal Impacts Juror Thinking about Other People
    § 5-4. The Vividness Effect: Sensual Persuasion
    § 5-5. The Velcro® Effect
    § 5-6. The Effects of Juror Mood on Juror Reasoning
    § 5-7. Deliberating Under the Influence of Stress
    § 5-8. The Effect of Stress on Citizens Selected for Jury Duty
    § 5-9. Anxiety: A Traveling Companion of Juror Stress
    § 5-10. The Effect of Sleep Debt on Juror Competency

    Chapter 6. BELIEFS AND THINKING
    § 6-1. Biology of Beliefs
    § 6-2. A Juror's TiVo® Mind
    § 6-3. Religious Beliefs
    § 6-4. The God Factor
    § 6-5. Differences that Make a Difference in Juror Thinking
    § 6-6. Juror Thinking about God and Science

    Chapter 7. THINKING UNAWARE
    § 7-1. Blink
    § 7-2. Mental Leaps

    PART III: THE SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY OF A JUROR'S PERCEPTIONS
    Chapter 8. FROM A FOCUS ON SELLING TOWARDS A FOCUS ON BUYING
    § 8-1. Information Anxiety
    § 8-2. Creating Empty Spaces as Evidence
    § 8-3. Toxic Language

    Chapter 9. HOW THE JUROR'S BRAIN TALKS TO ITSELF DURING TRIAL
    § 9-1. Mental Filters and Misperceptions
    § 9-2. Social Perception: What a Juror Sees Is What You Get
    § 9-3. Mental Short-Cuts a Juror Uses in Perception
    § 9-4. The Influence of Juror Categories and Schemas

    Chapter 10. A JUROR'S SOCIAL THINKING: How a Juror Makes Sense of the Behaviors of Other People
    § 10-1. Social Thinking and Juror Decision Making
    § 10-2. Juror Attributions
    § 10-3. The Effect of Novel Events
    § 10-4. Fundamental Attribution Error
    § 10-5. False Consensus Error
    § 10-6. False Uniqueness Error
    § 10-7. Attributions of Blame
    § 10-8. Locus of Control
    § 10-9. Cracked Perceptual Lenses
    § 10-10. A Practical Approach to Gaining Access to Juror Attitudes

    Chapter 11. THE DILEMMA OF A JUROR'S UN-THINKING TASK
    § 11-1. Intrusive Thoughts
    § 11-2. Controlled Un-Believing
    § 11-3. A Juror's Cognitive Load
    § 11-4. The Bad Experience Closet
    § 11-5. The Set-it-Aside Agenda

    Chapter 12. IMPERFECT THINKING
    § 12-1. Machine-Thinking
    § 12-2. Wabi-Sabi Minds
    § 12-3. Thinking in Paradox

    Chapter 13. SYMBOLIC THINKING
    § 13-1. God Words and Devil Words
    § 13-2. Metaphor and Thought

    PART IV: THE EFFECTS OF GROUP DYNAMICS ON A JUROR'S VOTE
    Chapter 14. THE WORK OF JURY WORK: WHEN INDIVIDUAL JURORS BECOME A GROUP
    § 14-1. The Faulty Norms of Jury Deliberations
    § 14-2. Changing the Way Jurors Deliberate

    Chapter 15. SOCIAL VERDICTS (THE RELATIONAL SIDE OF JURY DECISION-MAKING)
    § 15-1. Symbolic Convergence Theory: Groups and Fantasies
    § 15-2. Social Opinions
    § 15-3. Social Cliques
    § 15-4. Primary Tension and Secondary Tension: What Blocks the Jury's Task?
    § 15-5. Mars and Venus Deliberate--Gender in the Jury Room
    § 15-6. Salads, Stews, and Surprising Effects of Juror Diversity

    Chapter 16. EMOTIONAL DELIBERATIONS
    § 16-1. Emotional Persuasion
    § 16-2. Laughing on the Road to a Verdict
    § 16-3. Effects of Emotion on Juror Mood
    § 16-4. Emotional Argument
    § 16-5. Angry Argument: All People Are Afraid of the Anger of Others
    § 16-6. Emotional Pollution
    § 16-7. Groupmood

    Chapter 17. JUROR COMPETENCY
    § 17-1. A Juror's Trial Task (Competent to do what, exactly?)
    § 17-2. Juiced Jurors
    § 17-3. Multitasking Jurors
    § 17-4. Fluctuating Competency
    § 17-5. Juror Accommodation

    Chapter 18. JUROR COMPASSION
    § 18-1. Compassion in the Courtroom
    § 18-2. Measuring Compassion

    Chapter 19. THE SHADOW SIDE OF JURY DECISION MAKING
    § 19-1. Grouphate
    § 19-2. Social Loafing
    § 19-3. Missing in Action! Jurors Who Disappear in the Jury Room
    § 19-4. Toxic Jurors
    § 19-5. Seizing Speaking Turns
    § 19-6. What Really Happens When One Juror Leaves the Room
    § 19-7. Improperly Speculating
    § 19-8. Ignoring Misconduct of Fellow Jurors
    § 19-9. The Shadow Side of Jury Leadership
    § 19-10. The Consensus Disease

    Chapter 20. DECISIONAL REGRET IN THE JURY ROOM
    § 20-1. Juror Overconfidence
    § 20-2. Counterfactual Thinking: Changing the Facts
    § 20-3. Woulda/Coulda/Shoulda Minefields
    § 20-4. Why Deliberations Are a Set-Up for Woulda/Coulda/Shoulda Thinking
    § 20-5. A Storied Theory of Jury Deliberations
    § 20-6. Regret Contagion, GroupRegret, and Decisional Avoidance
    § 20-7. Story Plugs

    § 20-8. Coherence-Based Reasoning Theory

    Chapter 21. RE-THINKING
    § 21-1. Juror Flipping
    § 21-2. Ignoring Regret
    § 21-3. If-Only Thinking
    § 21-4. Binge-Think

    Chapter 22. STORY-THINKING AND FANTASIES DURING DELIBERATIONS
    § 23-1. The Storymaking-Mind of a Juror
    § 22-2. Story Battles in Deliberation
    § 22-3. Opening the Jury Room's Door: Making Sense of the Story Battles
    § 22-4. Storytelling Functions in Deliberations
    § 22-5. When Fantasies Collide: Symbolic Convergence Theory and Jury Decision Making
    § 22-6. Story Strategies for Attorneys

    Chapter 23. JURY-JOINING
    § 23-1. Collaborative Dialogues: How to Discuss What Matters Most
    § 23-2. Non-Question Voir Dire
    § 23-3. Collaborating on Solutions
    § 23-4. Collaborative Challenges for Cause
    § 23-5. Collaborative Closing Arguments

    Chapter 24. OPENING WINDOWS TO THE BLACK BOX OF JURY DELIBERATIONS
    § 24-1. Curing Ignorance about Jurors' Rights
    § 24-2. Reasons Jurors Think They Shouldn’t Communicate with the Judge
    § 24-3. Gaining An Ear to the Jury Wall
    § 24-4. Why Jurors Protect Bad Jurors
    § 24-5. Toxic Bailiffs: The Virus Every Jury Is Exposed To
    § 24-6. Exposing the Myths of Juries and Jurors

    PART V: TRIAL CULTURE
    Chapter 25 NEW TOOLS FOR EVERY TRIAL
    § 25-1. How a Juror Listens to an Expert's Opinion
    § 25-2. Organizing Juror Information
    § 25-3. Jury Markers
    § 25-4. Practical Juror Motions
    § 25-5. Tools for Learning About Jury Pools

    Chapter 26. STRUCTURES THAT INFLUENCE THINKING
    § 26-1. Jury Studies: Updates
    § 26-2. Jury Reform

    Chapter 27. THINKING UPSIDE DOWN
    § 27-1. When Jurors Rebut Your Closing
    § 27-2. PlayingAttention with the Final Act of Jurying

    Chapter 28. PAYING ATTENTION TO THE COMPLEX CULTURE OF TRIALS
    § 28-1. Enculturation: How Jurors Get Sucked Into a Strange System
    § 28-2. Twenty Stressful Realities of a Juror's Experience

    Chapter 29. THE ELECTRONIC-MEDIATED JUROR
    § 29-1. The Google™ Effect
    § 29-2. Cell Phones
    § 29-3. Social Network Sites as Unconfronted Trial Evidence
    § 29-4. The Blog Effect

    Chapter 30. REDUCING TOXIC TRIAL STRESS
    § 30-1. Avoiding The Helper's Pit
    § 30-2. Empathy-Driven versus Distress-Driven Advocacy
    § 30-3. Ever Aftering, in Practical Ways
    § 30-3(a). The Janus Effect

    APPENDICES: RESOURCES, BOOKS, MATERIALS, TOOLS
    Principles For Juries And Jury Trials, American Jury Project
    Principle 1 -- The Right To Jury Trial Shall Be Preserved
    Principle 2 -- Citizens Have The Right To Participate In Jury Service And Their Service Should Be Facilitated
    Principle 3 -- Juries Should Have 12 Members
    Principle 4 -- Jury Decisions Should Be Unanimous
    Principle 5 -- It Is The Duty Of The Courts To Enforce And Protect The Rights To Jury Trial And Jury Service
    Principle 6 -- Courts Should Educate Jurors Regarding The Essential Aspects Of A Jury Trial
    Principle 7 -- Courts Should Protect Juror Privacy Insofar As Consistent With The Requirements Of Justice And The Public Interest
    Principle 8 -- Individuals Selected To Serve On A Jury Have An Ongoing Interest In Completing Their Service
    Principle 9 -- Courts Should Conduct Jury Trials In The Venue Required By Applicable Law Or The Interests Of Justice
    Principle 10 -- Courts Should Use Open, Fair And Flexible Procedures To Select A Representative Pool Of Prospective Jurors
    Principle 11 -- Courts Should Ensure That The Process Used To Empanel Jurors Effectively Serves The Goal Of Assembling A Fair And Impartial Jury
    Principle 12 -- Courts Should Limit The Length Of Jury Trials Insofar As Justice Allows And Jurors Should Be Fully Informed Of The Trial Schedule Established
    Principle 13 -- The Court And Parties Should Vigorously Promote Juror Understanding Of The Facts And The Law
    Principle 14 --The Court Should Instruct The Jury In Plain And Understandable Language Regarding The Applicable Law And The Conduct Of Deliberations
    Principle 15 -- Courts And Parties Have A Duty To Facilitate Effective And Impartial Deliberations
    Principle 16 -- Deliberating Jurors Should Be Offered Assistance When An Apparent Impasse Is Reported
    Principle 17 -- Trial And Appellate Courts Should Afford Jury Decisions The Greatest Deference Consistent With Law
    Principle 18 -- Courts Should Give Jurors Legally Permissible Post-Verdict Advice And Information
    Principle 19 -- Appropriate Inquiries Into Allegations Of Juror Misconduct Should Be Promptly Undertaken By The Trial Court

    Resources and Tools
    Browse the Stacks
    Gratitudes
    Who Is the Author?
    Endnotes
    Index
    Dr. SunWolf is a juryologist. She has been fascinated with jurors (and their imperfect worlds) since her first trial. A veteran of many roles within the American justice system (law school faculty, civil litigation attorney, Training Director for Colorado's Public Defender System, full-time appellate lawyer, trial consultant)--a moment of epiphany during a death penalty trial pushed her back to graduate school, where she completed both Master's and Doctoral degrees in Interpersonal and Group Communication from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Now Professor of Communication at Santa Clara University, California, she teaches courses in relationships, group dynamics, friendships & romance, persuasion, storytelling, and the science of happiness. Her published research on jurors and children's peer groups has won national awards. Her books include Practical Jury Dynamics2: From One Juror's Trial Perceptions to the Group's Decision-Making Processes (LexisNexis). A translator of social science research for trial practitioners, Dr. SunWolf lectures at continuing legal education programs throughout the country. She is a 20-plus-year faculty member of the National Criminal Defense College. She is the originator of Decisional Regret Theory, which explains how jurors attempt to reduce the anxiety of anticipated verdict-regret by using counterfactual what-if and if-only imagined narratives. Professor SunWolf is also a Visiting Professor at Santa Clara University School of Law, annually teaching "449: Jury Law & Strategies"--devoted to thinking about a juror's complex trial task.

    The American Society of Trial Consultants gave Dr. SunWolf their national service award for career dedication to pro bono work. Her book Practical Jury Dynamics2 received the Ernest Bormann Book Award from the National Communication Association for most outstanding scholarly book in the previous two years about group communication. In 2008, Dr. SunWolf received her university's research award, recognizing the tenured professor whose scholarly work over the previous five years best represents a major contribution to a field of knowledge. On Twitter® Dr. SunWolf shares new studies on social behavior: @TheSocialBrain was named by the Huffington Post as one of 30 high-profile scientists who tweet about neuroscience. She also tweets about jury law, strategies, and events as @JuryTalk. Web: ProfessorSunwolf.com
  • God-Thinking: Every Juror's Moral Brain, Religious Beliefs, and Their Effects on a Trial Verdict

    Author : SunWolf, J.D., Ph.D

    Publisher : LexisNexis

    Available Formats :
    • Format: Softbound, 244 pgs., Print Book
      ISBN: 9780769883229

      $59 {"prodid": "prod19670481", "pubstatus" : "132", "sku" : "sku8620419"}
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      ISBN: 9780769883236

      $59 {"prodid": "prod19670481", "pubstatus" : "132", "sku" : "sku-us-ebook-24570-epub"}
    • Format: Electronic book: mobi
      ISBN: 9780769883236

      $59 {"prodid": "prod19670481", "pubstatus" : "132", "sku" : "sku-us-ebook-24570-mobi"}
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    God-Thinking: Every Juror's Moral Brain, Religious Beliefs, and Their Effects on a Trial Verdict
    View a sample of this title using the ReadNow feature

    A wide variety of moral compasses is sitting in every jury box! Jurors bring their religions and spiritual beliefs with them to court and rely upon personal moral compasses during deliberations. Every trial, civil or criminal, can become a battle of good and evil in the minds of the jurors, yet trial advocacy books have ignored this dynamic. This book invites trial practitioners, attorneys, judges, and consultants to engage in new thinking about how jurors' moral compasses affect trial outcomes.

    Dr. SunWolf was a long-time trial and appellate attorney, now an award-winning social scientist and university professor, who takes the reader into the latest research about the psychology of good and evil and our believing brain--then points to specific ways every juror's religious thinking impacts a verdict, including:

    •  The Neuroscience of Fair Play
    •  The Social Psychology of Good and Evil
    •  The God Gene and the Biology of Belief
    •  The Science of Moral Dilemmas
    •  Questionnaire Items that Uncover a Juror's Moral Compass
    •  Voir Dire Questions and Conversations about the Jury Pool's Religious Thinking
    •  Trial Tools and Motions that Take a Juror's God-Thinking Into Account
    •  Pre-Trial Investigations that Reveal a Community's Religious Landscape

    As trial practitioners, our job must deal with the variety of moral belief systems jurors are bringing to our courtrooms, in a manner that moves us towards fairer trials and more just verdicts.

    FORETHOUGHTS

    PART I: GOOD AND EVIL IN EVERY JUROR'S MIND

    Chapter 1. The Social Psychology of Good and Evil

    § 1-1. Free Will and Determinism in the Garden of Good and Evil
    § 1-2. The Psychology of Good: Altruism and Helping Behaviors
    § 1-3. The Psychology of Evil: Aggression, Racism, Deception
    § 1-4. Forgiveness and Vengeance
    § 1-5. The Neuroscience of Fair Play

    Chapter 2. Brain Science: The Biology of Right and Wrong Thinking

    § 2-1. The God Gene: Faith May Be Hard-Wired
    § 2-2. Brain Science and the Biology of Belief
    § 2-3. Where Morality Lives: Every Juror's Moral Brain

    Chapter 3. Neurotheology and the Ethical Brain

    § 3-1. Neurotheology: Spiritual Neuroscience
    § 3-2. The Ethical Brain: The Science of Moral Dilemmas

    PART II: MORAL ISSUES IN EVERY TRIAL

    Chapter 4. Religion in Our Jury Pools

    § 4-1. The Religious Landscape in Our Communities
    § 4-2. Venire
    § 4-3. Jury Selection

    Chapter 5. Trial Events That Intersect with Religion

    § 5-1. Trial Days and Hours
    § 5-2. Oaths
    § 5-3. Credibility of Witnesses
    § 5-4. Evidence
    § 5-5. Instructions of Law
    § 5-6. Closing Arguments
    § 5-7. Deliberations
    § 5-8. Verdicts

    PART III: TRIAL TOOLS THAT ACKNOWLEDGE JUROR GOD-THINKING

    Chapter 6. Jury Selection: Discovering the Moral Minds in a Jury Pool

    § 6-1. Voir Dire to Harvest and Explore a Juror's Moral Mind
    § 6-2. Voir Dire Strategies for Creating a Successful Challenge for Cause
    § 6-3. A 10-Step Challenge for Cause Dance
    § 6-4. Sample Approach to Developing a Challenge for Cause as Applied to Religious Beliefs
    § 6-5. Rethinking Questionnaire Items That Harvest God-Thinking Experiences

    Chapter 7. Motions: Requests That Make a Difference

    § 7-1. Requests for Questionnaires That Deal with a Potential Juror's Religion
    § 7-2. Request for Voir Dire by Court on Issues Dealing with a Juror's Religious Beliefs
    § 7-3. Request for Opportunity to Voir Dire on Specific Religious Beliefs
    § 7-4. Request for Specific Accommodations for Jurors Based on Their Religious Beliefs and Practices
    § 7-5. Requests for Instructions to Jurors Limiting the Religious Material or Discussions That Might Occur During Trial or Deliberations
    § 7-6. Challenge to Jury Venire Based on Non-Representative Methods of Assembling the Venire

    Chapter 8. Appellate Courts: God and Religion on Appeal

    Chapter 9. Pre-Trial Investigations That Reveal Religious Landscapes

    § 9-1. Religious Scene Investigations [RSI]
    § 9-2. Background Checks

    AFTERTHOUGHTS

    Religion Is a Spiritual Lens for Judging Other People
    The Red Queen Effect
    Tread Lightly: Caveats

    RESOURCES

    A. Web Sites and Blogs About Religion
    B. Sample Law Review Articles
    C. Exemplar Court Opinions Involving Jurors and Religion
    D. Fields v. Brown: An Appellate Decision Demonstrating
    How Jurors Bring Religion into Deliberations
    E. Books That Deepen an Understanding of Good & Evil in the Jury Room

    Gratitudes
    About the Author
    Index
    Dr. SunWolf is a juryologist. She has been fascinated with jurors (and their imperfect worlds) since her first trial. A veteran of many roles within the American justice system (law school faculty, civil litigation attorney, Training Director for Colorado's Public Defender System, full-time appellate lawyer, trial consultant)--a moment of epiphany during a death penalty trial pushed her back to graduate school, where she completed both Master's and Doctoral degrees in Interpersonal and Group Communication from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Now Professor of Communication at Santa Clara University, California, she teaches courses in relationships, group dynamics, friendships & romance, persuasion, storytelling, and the science of happiness. Her published research on jurors and children's peer groups has won national awards. Her books include Practical Jury Dynamics2: From One Juror's Trial Perceptions to the Group's Decision-Making Processes (LexisNexis). A translator of social science research for trial practitioners, Dr. SunWolf lectures at continuing legal education programs throughout the country. She is a 20-plus-year faculty member of the National Criminal Defense College. She is the originator of Decisional Regret Theory, which explains how jurors attempt to reduce the anxiety of anticipated verdict-regret by using counterfactual what-if and if-only imagined narratives. Professor SunWolf is also a Visiting Professor at Santa Clara University School of Law, annually teaching "449: Jury Law & Strategies"--devoted to thinking about a juror's complex trial task.

    The American Society of Trial Consultants gave Dr. SunWolf their national service award for career dedication to pro bono work. Her book Practical Jury Dynamics2 received the Ernest Bormann Book Award from the National Communication Association for most outstanding scholarly book in the previous two years about group communication. In 2008, Dr. SunWolf received her university's research award, recognizing the tenured professor whose scholarly work over the previous five years best represents a major contribution to a field of knowledge. On Twitter® Dr. SunWolf shares new studies on social behavior: @TheSocialBrain was named by the Huffington Post as one of 30 high-profile scientists who tweet about neuroscience. She also tweets about jury law, strategies, and events as @JuryTalk. Web: ProfessorSunwolf.com
  • Jury Talk DVD

    Author : Dr. SunWolf

    Publisher : LexisNexis

    Available Formats :
    • Format: DVD - 2 discs, Print Book
      ISBN: 9781422434031

      $230 {"prodid": "58890", "pubstatus" : "132", "sku" : "SKU58890"}
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    • View a clip of Jury Talk

    Jury Talk DVD
    Filmed before a live audience, Dr. SunWolf shares 3-1/2 hours of cutting-edge tools for every trial including:

    * STRESSED, MEDICATED, & SLEEP-DEPRIVED JURORS
    * JUROR COMPETENCY
    * RELIGIOUS JURORS
    * NEW ITEMS FOR QUESTIONNAIRES
    * THE NOT-A-QUESTION VOIR DIRE
    * THE BIOPSYCHOLOGY OF A JUROR’S MIND
    * CHANGING COURTROOM CONDITIONS
    * HOW JURORS MAKE SENSE OF OTHER PEOPLE
    * GOD & DEVIL WORDS
    * VOIR DIRE EXPERTS SO JURORS DISREGARD THEIR OPINIONS
    * JUROR MISCONDUCT
    * JUROR NOTES YOU WANT THEM TO SEND
    * NEW JUROR INFORMATION SHEETS

    Dr. SunWolf is a juryologist. She has been fascinated with jurors (and their imperfect worlds) since her first trial. A veteran of many roles within the American justice system (law school faculty, civil litigation attorney, Training Director for Colorado's Public Defender System, full-time appellate lawyer, trial consultant)--a moment of epiphany during a death penalty trial pushed her back to graduate school, where she completed both Master's and Doctoral degrees in Interpersonal and Group Communication from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Now Professor of Communication at Santa Clara University, California, she teaches courses in relationships, group dynamics, friendships & romance, persuasion, storytelling, and the science of happiness. Her published research on jurors and children's peer groups has won national awards. Her books include Practical Jury Dynamics2: From One Juror's Trial Perceptions to the Group's Decision-Making Processes (LexisNexis). A translator of social science research for trial practitioners, Dr. SunWolf lectures at continuing legal education programs throughout the country. She is a 20-plus-year faculty member of the National Criminal Defense College. She is the originator of Decisional Regret Theory, which explains how jurors attempt to reduce the anxiety of anticipated verdict-regret by using counterfactual what-if and if-only imagined narratives. Professor SunWolf is also a Visiting Professor at Santa Clara University School of Law, annually teaching "449: Jury Law & Strategies"--devoted to thinking about a juror's complex trial task.

    The American Society of Trial Consultants gave Dr. SunWolf their national service award for career dedication to pro bono work. Her book Practical Jury Dynamics2 received the Ernest Bormann Book Award from the National Communication Association for most outstanding scholarly book in the previous two years about group communication. In 2008, Dr. SunWolf received her university's research award, recognizing the tenured professor whose scholarly work over the previous five years best represents a major contribution to a field of knowledge. On Twitter® Dr. SunWolf shares new studies on social behavior: @TheSocialBrain was named by the Huffington Post as one of 30 high-profile scientists who tweet about neuroscience. She also tweets about jury law, strategies, and events as @JuryTalk. Web: ProfessorSunwolf.com
    Filmed before a live audience, Dr. Sunwolf shares 3 1/2 hours of cutting-edge tools for every trial including:

    -Stressed, Medicated, & Sleep-Deprived Jurors
    -Juror Competency
    -Religious Jurors
    -New Items For Questionnaires
    -The Not-A-Question Voir Dire
    -The Biopsychology Of A Juror’s Mind
    -Changing Courtroom Conditions
    -How Jurors Make Sense Of Other People
    -God & Devil Words
    -Voir Dire Experts So Jurors Disregard Their Opinions
    -Juror Misconduct
    -Juror Notes You Want Them To Send
    -New Juror Information Sheets

    View a Clip of Jury Talk >> (Windows Media 16mb)
  • Sunwolf, Ph.D., J.D.

    DR. SUNWOLF has been fascinated with juries and their strange customs since her first jury trial in 1975. She is a veteran of many roles within the American justice system including civil litigation attorney, law school clinical education faculty, Training Director for Colorado’s Public Defender System and trial consultant.

    She completed both a Master’s and Doctoral degree in Interpersonal and Group Communication from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Dr. Sunwolf is now an Associate Professor of Communication at Santa Clara University, California. An active trial consultant and media-trial analyst, she serves on trial advocacy faculties nationally and teaches at continuing education programs throughout the country.

    Education
    Scholarship
    Books
    Literary Publications
    Scholarship Honors

     

    Education

    University of California Santa Barbara

    Ph.D. Communication (1998) Dissertation:
    Unlocking the Jury Box: Structure, Leadership, and Storytelling in Jury Deliberations

    M.A. Communication (1997) Thesis:
    Jurors' Intuitive Rules for Deliberation: A Structurational Approach to Communication in Jury Decision Making

    University of Denver, College of Law: J.D. Law (1976)
    California State University Fresno: B.A. Psychology (1971), summa cum laude
    Santa Clara University, Division of Counseling Psychology

    Post doctoral coursework (2000 – 2003, focus: group dynamics, interpersonal relationships)

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    Scholarship

    Juries and Law

    Sunwolf (November, 2004). Moving forward/looking back: Persuasive argument and jury decision making. Paper accepted, to be presented to the Group Communication Division of the National Communication Association for the Annual Convention, Chicago, IL.

    Sunwolf (in press). Facilitating death talk: Creating collaborative courtroom conversations about the death penalty between indigent defense counsel and potential jurors. In L. R. Frey & K. Carragee (Eds.), Studies in communication activism. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.

    Sunwolf. (in press). Empathic attunement facilitation: Stimulating immediate task engagement in zero-history training groups of helping professionals. In L. R. Frey (Ed.), Facilitating group communication: Innovations and applications with natural groups: Vol. 1: Facilitating group creation, conflict, and conversation. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press. [Facilitating training sessions of capital defense lawyers.]

    Sunwolf (2001). Toxic words: How courts co-opt defense attorneys into using language that facilitates conviction. The Champion, 25(7), 28 – 32.

    Sunwolf (November, 2001). Decisional regret theory: Reducing the anxiety of group decision making through shared counterfactual storytelling. Paper presented to the Group Communication Division of the National Communication Association Convention, Atlanta, GA.

    Sunwolf (2000). Restorying reality in the juryroom: Real jurors’ uses of what-if and if-only stories in both deadlocked and verdict-producing deliberations. Paper presented to the Commission on Communication and Law of the National Communication Association Convention, Seattle, WA.

    Sunwolf (2000). Talking story in trial: The power of narrative persuasion. The Champion, 24(8), 26 – 31.

    Sunwolf (1999). Telling tales in jury deliberations: Jurors’ uses of fictionalized and factually based storytelling in argument. Paper presented at the Group Communication Division of the National Communication Association Convention, Chicago, IL

    Sunwolf (1999). Unlocking the jury box: Structuring and leadership in real-life jury deliberations. Paper presented at the Commission on Communication and Law of the National Communication Association Convention, Chicago, IL.

    Sunwolf, & Seibold, D. R. (1998). Jurors' intuitive rules for deliberation: A structurational approach to the study of communication in jury decision making. Communication Monographs, 65, 282 – 307.

    Sunwolf (1994). Communication in deadlocked juries: When cross-sections of the community collide. Paper presented in the Small Group Interaction Division of the Speech Communication Association Convention, New Orleans, LA.

    Sunwolf (1994). Jury selection, strategies for the challenge for cause. Paper presented at the North Carolina Academy of Trial Lawyers Death Penalty Litigation Seminar, Greensboro, NC.

    Group Dynamics

    Sunwolf, & Frey, L. R. (in press). Facilitating group communication. In S. Wheelan (Ed.), The handbook of group research and practice. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

    Frey, L. R., & Sunwolf (in press). The communication perspective of group research and practice. In S. Wheelan (Ed.), The handbook of group research and practice. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

    Frey, L. R., & Sunwolf (in press). The symbolic-interpretive perspective on group life. In M. S. Poole & A. Hollingshead (Eds.), Theories of small groups: Interdisciplinary perspectives. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

    Sunwolf, & Leets, L. (2004). Being left out: Rejecting outsiders and communicating group boundaries in childhood and adolescent peer groups. Journal of Applied Communication Research, 32(3), 195 – 223.

    Frey, L. R., & Sunwolf (2004). A symbolic-interpretive perspective on group dynamics. Small Group Research, 35(3), 277 – 306.

    Sunwolf, & Leets, L. (2003). Communication paralysis during peer group exclusion: Social dynamics that prevent children and adolescents from expressing disagreement. Journal of Language and Social Psychology, 22. 355-384.

    Sunwolf (2003, November). Groupmood and member affect: Investigating the emergence and expression of emotions during group argument. Paper presented to the Group Communication Division of the National Communication Association Convention, Palm Beach, FL.

    Sunwolf (2002). Getting to “GroupAha!”: Provoking creative processes in task groups. In L. R. Frey (Ed.), New directions in group communication (pp. 203 – 217). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

    Sunwolf, & Seibold, D. R. (1999). The impact of formal problem-solving procedures on group processes, members, and task outcomes. In L. R. Frey (Ed.), D. S. Gouran, & M. S. Poole (Assoc. Eds.), The handbook of group communication theory and research (pp. 395 – 431). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

    Seibold, D. R., Meyers, R. A., & Sunwolf (1996). Communication and influence in group decision making. In R. Y. Hirokawa & M. S. Poole (Eds.), Communication and group decision making (2nd ed., pp. 242 – 268). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

    Storytelling Effects

    Sunwolf, Frey, L. R., & Keränen, L. (in press). Rx Story-prescriptions: Healing effects of storytelling and storylistening in the practice of medicine. In L. M. Harter, P. M. Japp, & C. S. Beck (Eds.), Constructing our health: The implications of narrative for enacting illness and wellness. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

    Sunwolf (in press). Telling multicultural tales in applied contexts: Unexpected journeys into healing and interconnectedness in hospitals and courtrooms. In P. J. Cooper, C. Calloway-Thomas, & C. Simonds (Eds.), Telling tales: Intercultural communication. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

    Sunwolf (2004). Once upon a time for the soul: A review of the effects of storytelling in spiritual traditions. Communication Research Trends, 23(3), 3 – 19.

    Sobol, J., Gentile, J., & Sunwolf (2004). Once upon a time: An introduction to the inaugural issue. Storytelling, Self, Society, 1(1), 1 – 7.

    Sunwolf (2004). Stories as medicine. Journal of Communication Studies, 21(2). 5 – 14.

    Honos-Webb, L., Sunwolf, & Shapiro, J. L. (2004). The healing power of telling stories in psychotherapy. In J. D. Raskin & S. K. Bridges (Eds.), Studies in meaning 2: Bridging the personal and social in constructivist psychology. New York: Pace University Press.

    Sunwolf (2003). Grief tales: The therapeutic power of folktales to heal bereavement and loss. Diving in the Moon: Honoring Story, Facilitating Healing, 4, 36 – 42.

    Sunwolf, & Frey, L. R. (2001). Storytelling: The power of narrative communication and interpretation. In W. P. Robinson, & H. Giles (Eds.), The new handbook of language and social psychology (pp. 119 – 135). Sussex: Wiley.

    Honos-Webb, L., Sunwolf, & Shapiro, J. (2001). Towards the re-enchantment of psychotherapy: The container model of storying in treatment. Humantistic Psychologist, 29, 70 – 97.

    Sunwolf (1999). The pedagogical and persuasive effects of Native American lesson stories, African dilemma tales, and Sufi wisdom tales. Howard Journal of Communications, 10, 47 – 71.

    Cargile, A. C., & Sunwolf (1998). Does the squeaky wheel get the grease? Understanding direct and indirect communication. In T. Singelis (Ed.), Teaching about race, culture and diversity (pp. 221-229). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. [Use of multicultural tales to change cultural thinking.]

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    Books

    Sunwolf (2004). Practical jury dynamics: From one juror’s trial perceptions to the group’s decision making process. Charlottesville, VA: LexisNexis.

    Sunwolf (in press). Gift giving unwrapped: Strategies and stresses during the giving or receiving of gifts. New York: Peter Lang Publishers, Language and Social Action series.

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    Literary Publications

    Sunwolf (2003). The truth about red. Santa Clara Review, 90, 54 – 57.

    Sunwolf (2002). The man who dreamed a lawn: An urban love tale. Santa Clara Review, 89, 33 – 36.

    Sunwolf (1997). The boy who would not raise his hand in class. Storytelling Magazine, 9(1), 41.

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    Scholarship Honors

    First Annual Dennis S. Gouran Research Award (2000), Group Communication Division of the National Communication Association, most outstanding scholarly journal article, for: Sunwolf, & Seibold, D. R. (1998). Jurors’ intuitive rules for deliberation: A structurational approach to the study of communication in jury decision making. Communication Monographs, 65, 282 – 307.

    Sunwolf, & Leets, L. (2003). Communication paralysis during childhood social exclusion: Social dynamics that prevent children from expressing disagreement with peer group rejection of others. Top Four Paper, Language and Social Interaction Division of the Western States Communication Association.

    Sunwolf, & Leets, L. (2002). Being left out: Communicating group boundaries and resisting inclusion attempts in childhood peer groups. Top ranked paper, Group Communication Division of the National Communication Association.

    Sunwolf (1999). Telling tales in jury deliberations: Jurors’ uses of fictionalized and factually based storytelling in argument. Top Three Paper, Group Communication Division of the National Communication Association.

    Sunwolf (1999). Unlocking the jury box: Structuring and leadership in real-life jury deliberations. Top Quantitative Paper, Commission on Communication and Law of the National Communication Association.

    Sunwolf, & Seibold, D. R. (1997). Jurors' intuitive rules for deliberation: A structurational approach to the study of communication in jury decision making. Top Paper, Applied Communication Division of the National Communication Association.

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