Environmental

Recent Posts

An entirely new carbon sink in the oceans may have been discovered
Posted on 30 Nov 2010 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

One of the themes that has run through prior posts is to note that our understanding of the carbon cycle may leave more than a little to be desired. Such lack of understanding may explain why the impacts of global warming are, in some cases, more severe... Read More

COP15 will not change climate change reporting requirements for companies
Posted on 28 Apr 2010 by Colleen Theron

By Colleen Theron, Environmental solicitor and consultant. Despite the inconclusive outcome of COP15 and the significant issues facing countries in the coming year to implement a legally binding agreement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), a... Read More

Arctic salt clouds are reducting the impact of Global Climate Change on the Arctic region
Posted on 15 May 2011 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

Prior posts have noted both the various impacts of Global Climate Change ("GCC") on various aspects of the Earth and its atmospheric systems, as well as the failure of many/most models to include such impacts within their parameters. For example... Read More

Natural gas development poses a risk of enhancing GHG emissions due to "leakage", note new studies
Posted on 11 Apr 2011 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

Several prior posts have noted the greenhouse impact of methane (aka natural gas); it has many times the warming effect as carbon dioxide (CO2), which seems to be the focus of so much discussion about global warming. The posts have focused on the numerous... Read More

Movement of corals around Japan provides evidence of global warming
Posted on 27 Jan 2011 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

Prior posts have noted that in terms of ascertaining evidence of global warming, it may be worthwhile to assess the numerous studies of various potential indicators (e.g., migration patterns, drought, relocation of biota). Add another indicator. A... Read More

Trees damaged by bark beetles slow their uptake of CO2 for up to a century
Posted on 20 Apr 2011 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

As noted in prior posts, bark beetles damage large forest areas, often killing or causing the death of 50% to 80% of mature trees. As these trees decompose, they release CO2, adding to the atmospheric burden of GHG's. New research has identified additional... Read More

The trend toward use of heavier crudes increases the carbon footprint of petroleum products
Posted on 6 Dec 2010 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

Heavier crudes are, by definition, more viscous. The also contain greater amounts of sulfur, which must be removed because of the adverse impact of sulfur on various catalysts used in the refining process. The sulfur content of fuel is also controlled... Read More

Solar cells are becoming less expensive
Posted on 16 Dec 2010 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

"The future, according to MiaSolé, a Californian start-up, is unrolling at one centimetre a second in a bland-looking building in Silicon Valley. Despite the location, and the fact that most other solar cells are made from silicon, MiaSolé's... Read More

Lakes across the globe are warming up
Posted on 3 Dec 2010 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

Throughout the past quarter-century, inland lakes have been experiencing a small, steadily rising nighttime fever. Globally, the average increase has hovered around 0.045 degrees Celsius per year, but in some regions the increase has been more than twice... Read More

Electric cars may entail more than putting an electric motor where the internal combustion engine goes
Posted on 2 May 2010 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

The replacement of the internal combustion engine and drive-train with electric motor(s), batteries, and control systems is leading to a rethink of the way in which cars are designed and manufactured. One of the proposals, which dates from the turn of... Read More

The solar cycle is decreasing the impact of GHG emissions, but probably only for the near-term
Posted on 21 Apr 2011 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

The sun's activity waxes and wanes on a cycle that averages roughly 11 years, though cycles as short as nine years and as long as 14 years have been observed. Chinese astronomers were already tracking the sun's activity using sunspots more than... Read More