Lexis® Hub

    • 24 Aug 2012

    Still Looking for the Right Law Job? The SMART Way to Start Your Solo Practice

    This has been a year of bad news for law school graduates looking to follow the traditional path of joining a mid-size or large firm. For example, the Wall Street Journal reported, based on its own assessment of law school graduation data from nearly 200 accredited schools, that members of the law school class of 2011 had little better than a 50-50 shot of landing a long-term job as a lawyer at a firm within nine months...
    • 24 Jul 2012

    Michigan Federal Judge Dismisses Suit Accusing Law School Of Giving False Statistics

    A Michigan federal judge on July 20 dismissed a class complaint accusing Thomas M. Cooley Law School of misrepresenting its graduates' employment statistics to entice new students to enroll and then saddling them with tens of thousands of dollars in debt (John T. MacDonald Jr., et al. v. Thomas M. Cooley Law School, et al., No. 11-831, W.D. Mich.; 2012 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 100785). "Because, in this Court's judgment...
    • 26 Jun 2012

    Long-Term Legal Jobs Remain Elusive for Recent Grads

    Just over half of the members of the 2011 Law School graduating class have been able to find long term employment in the legal profession, according to statistics from the ABA data clearinghouse, Law School Transparency . The study analyzed data from 195 domestic ABA approved law schools and reports the following devastating news for recent grads: The ABA data shed considerable light on how poorly the 2011 graduates...
    • 24 Jun 2012

    Handling Constructive Feedback Like a Professional

    One of the more difficult things to get used to when you are working in a law firm (or other corporate) environment is the idea of constructive feedback. No matter how constructive the feedback, it can feel offensive, or off-putting. Instead of energizing or motivating us, we spend a few moments crafting reasons we never really liked the messenger of the feedback in the first place, and then we get on with our lives without...
    • 20 Jun 2012

    Associates Rank the Top Law Firms

    The 2013 Vault Law 100 is here! This year almost 17,000 associates took our survey, and their unequivocal view is that Wachtell is still on top-for the tenth year in a row. Let's take a look at the rest of the top ten: Wachtell Lipton Rosen & Katz Cravath, Swaine & Moore Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom Sullivan & Cromwell Davis Polk & Wardwell Weil, Gotshal & Manges...
    • 1 Jun 2012

    Outsourcing vs. the Junior Associate

    " To compete in this world, law firms will have to begin considering how they might engage in the same disaggregation process as their clients." Milton C. Regan and Palmer T. Heenan, Supply Chains and Porous Boundaries: The Disaggregation of Legal Services, 78 FORDHAM L. REV. 2137, 2139 (2010). Outsourcing in many industries has been taking place for a long time, but has seen a recent uptick in the market...
    • 9 Apr 2012

    Increasing Billable Hour Targets: Can Higher Expectations be Sustained?

    More Hours? Firms had already begun to set billable hour targets and minimum requirements for their partners and associates. [1] Conventional wisdom at the time held 1500 as the maximum number of hours lawyers could reasonably expect to bill, equating to just over 30 billable hours per week making modest allowances for vacation, sick leave, personal time, etc. [2] (It is worth noting here the many studies showing that...
    • 21 Mar 2012

    Law Grads from "Non-Elite" Law Schools Proving Partnership Ability

    Graduates from lower-ranked law schools may have a tougher time getting jobs in larger firms, but tend to land partnership positions in higher numbers. By reviewing partnership data provided by the National Law Journal , Indiana University law professor William Hendrickson determined that graduates from lower-ranked Loyola University Chicago Law School, for example, are six times more likely to become partners than graduates...
    • 20 Mar 2012

    Associates Must Jump on the Partnership Track Sooner than Ever

    There is no gentle learning curve or methodical training for associates who are expected to hit the ground running, bringing business to the firm as early in their careers as possible. It's all about rainmaking. The ABA Journal notes that associates with partnership aspirations need to get on the business development fast track right away. In today's upended legal landscape, new law firm associates are expected...
    • 12 Mar 2012

    Law Firm Hiring Still Tight at Top Firms, Even for the Most Sought-After Law Grads

    With the U.S. economy showing signs of improvement, law firms remain hesitant to boost associate hiring. As the National Law Journal observes, "It's Tough out There," or maybe the more appropriate title would be, It's STILL tough out there . Law.com noted recently that fewer associates were hired at the nation's largest 250 law firms in 2011 than in 2010. Definitely a step in the wrong direction...
    • 24 Feb 2012

    Cries for Legal Education Reforms Grow Louder as Respected law Professor Prepares to Release Critical Book

    "Behind the flourishing façade, law schools are failing abjectly," former Law School Dean and Professor Brian Z. Tamanaha writes in the preface to his soon-to-be released book, Failing Law Schools . Tamanaha, a renowned legal scholar, points out the flaws in an educational system where students take on several hundred thousand dollars in the hope of joining an industry where average starting salaries...
    • 15 Feb 2012

    Would You Accept an Unpaid Internship?

    Unpaid internships are under attack! Unpaid internships have picked up some unwanted mainstream media attention lately. Recently, a former unpaid intern filed a lawsuit against Harper's Bazaar, alleging violations of state and federal wage and hour laws . She's also hoping to make it into a class action against other Hearst publications, including Cosmo, Seventeen, and Good Housekeeping. The New York Times...
    • 7 Feb 2012

    Recent Ups and Downs in Legal Hiring

    The headlines on employment overall are encouraging. The Labor Department reports that unemployment dropped to 8.3% in January. For the legal profession, the January figures are promising with a thousand new jobs reported. The downside of that statistic is that 1,800 legal sector jobs evaporated in December. With these fluctuations it is sometimes hard to gauge improvement in law job prospects. The best way to summarize...
    • 1 Feb 2012

    Are Lean Times the “New Normal” in New Attorney Hiring?

    There are no short memories when it comes to the actions law firms had to take to stay afloat during the recent recession, and recurring nightmares about it continue to mean reduced prospects for those at the bottom rung of the legal profession ladder. Even as the economy begins to rebound and business returns, many firms are either not convinced that recovery will be lasting or extreme caution is now ingrained as a permanent...
    • 1 Feb 2012

    Part-time Work Among Lawyers Declines for the First Time in 17 Years

    Most Working Part Time Continue to be Women The National Association of Law Placement (NALP) released the following press release surveying part time employment in the legal profession: Most large law firms have made part-time schedules available to their experienced lawyers for many years, but overall the number of lawyers working part-time continues to be very small, and in fact the number edged down in...
    • 1 Feb 2012

    Survey Says: College Graduates not Prepared for the Workforce

    The economy is slowly showing signs of improvement, but the unemployment rate for recent college graduates remains at 8.9% - higher than the national average. Unemployment in some industries tops 13% for those just launching their career. Despite recent positive news on the job front, most new graduates are still facing an uphill battle to find work. More surprisingly, according to a new survey commissioned by Woods Bagot...
    • 7 Nov 2011

    Five Signs that the Economy is Improving

    The planets seem to be aligning for a better economy. I know - in the past I have told people to ignore the numbers , because they are always changing and losing their meaning and only serve to stress people out. But it's hard to ignore new data coming out that will give people a reason to be happy as we start heading into the New Year. Here are five signs the economy is actually moving in the right direction: ...
    • 15 Sep 2011

    Legal Industry is Currently the Toughest Career Segment for New Job Seekers

    Finding a job in this economy is not for the faint hearted. It's a tough proposition all around, but some fields are having a more difficult time than others. According to the Wall Street Journal the legal field is currently the hardest-to-place industry, with only one available job opening for every 100 working attorneys. The job site SimplyHired.com reports a 1.9% decrease in job listings for lawyers and legal professionals...
    • 5 Sep 2011

    Hidden Culprit Behind Law School Tuition Rates

    It's easy to pick on law schools for imposing exorbitant tuition fees and driving its students into a lifetime of non-dischargeable debt. Law schools pay their professors cushy salaries, fill their lecture halls with obscenely expensive chairs, and always seem to be in some state of renovation or new construction - ostensibly in an attempt to bring the school up to date with the "new era of legal education."...
    • 2 Sep 2011

    Ugliness as the Next Protected Class

    "Never Pick a Fight with an Ugly Person, They've Got Nothing to Lose." In Sunday's New York Times , University of Texas economics professor Daniel Hamermesh penned an op-ed entitled, "Ugly? You May Have a Case." He argues that the law should protect "ugly" the same as race, sex, and disability. Here's his thesis: [B]eing attractive ... helps you earn more money.... The effects...
    • 1 Sep 2011

    Why Attorneys Must Extend Professional Courtesy in Discovery or Receive an Invitation to a "Kindergarten Party"

    Federal judge Sam Sparks recently issued an order inviting two attorneys to a "kindergarten party" that also featured a possible sleepover with United States Marshals. Annoyed by what he considered the immature and unprofessional conduct of attorneys in a dispute over deposition scheduling and subpoenas, Judge Sparks issued the order directing counsel to appear before him. While the order is amusing, Judge Sparks...
    • 31 Aug 2011

    Back to the Future? Even Non-ABA Accredited Grads Can Sit for Minnesota Bar

    The Minnesota Law Blog recently reported on the Minnesota Supreme Court's decision last week to change its admission rules. The new rules will allow licensed attorneys from other states to sit for the Minnesota bar exam. But that's not all. The ruling also covers attorneys who graduated from non-American Bar Association accredited law schools. Will lawyers once again be able to " read the law " without...
    • 30 Aug 2011

    Race to the Front of the Line Starts Early for Prospective Summer Associates

    Law schools are trying to give students an edge in the hunt for Summer Associate positions for next year by starting the recruiting process earlier. Interviews that were traditionally held in September and October are now occurring in August at many Law Schools, according to the Wall Street Journal . With hiring down and the number of available graduates increasing, law schools are pushing top law firms to recruit in...
    • 28 Aug 2011

    Americans Face Widening “Justice Gap”

    Last week, the New York Times published an editorial lamenting the widening "justice gap" and the lack of quality legal services available to low-income individuals. The article makes many valid observations, including the fact that the Legal Services Corporation, a government-funded organization that provides civil legal assistances to the poor, has seen its budget slashed by about one-third over the past decade...
    • 22 Aug 2011

    Former Associate Demands More High-quality Work, with Disastrous Results

    Associates at large law firms typically aren't assigned the most ground-breaking or intellectually stimulating work during their first years, but one former Kasowitz associate believes that his unjustly mundane workload merits a 75-million dollar suit against his former employer. Gregory S. Berry, who was fired by Kasowitz Benson Torres & Friedman after demanding more high-quality work better suited for his...