Litigation

Foley Hoag Will Open Paris Office, Expand International Litigation And Arbitration Practice

BOSTON - Leading international litigation and arbitration lawyers Bruno Leurent and Thomas Bevilacqua will open Foley Hoag in Paris, giving Foley Hoag LLP its first overseas office and expanding its renowned International Litigation and Arbitration Practice Group to one of the world's centers of international arbitration.

Leurent and Bevilacqua, who will join Foley Hoag as partners from Winston & Strawn in Paris, focus on international litigation and arbitration, with particular experience in the international commercial arbitration arena.

Foley Hoag's work with numerous international clients through its International Litigation and Arbitration Practice Group has bolstered its reputation for advising foreign states and companies with complex legal issues. The Paris office will allow Foley Hoag attorneys to serve clients on the ground in France and provide them with access to Eastern Europe, the Middle East and Francophone Africa.

The firm's Investor-State Arbitration Practice has counseled government and state-owned business entities in disputes between investors and sovereign states at many of the world's top arbitration forums. For more than 25 years, Foley Hoag has successfully represented sovereign states in disputes with other states, and it has one of the largest caseloads of any firm at the International Court of Justice in The Hague, Netherlands. The firm also represents U.S. and international companies in a variety of commercial litigation and arbitration matters.

Once it receives final approvals from the Paris Bar, the new Paris office, organized as an AARPI (a French law professional partnership) associated with Foley Hoag LLP, will work closely with the firm's lawyers in Washington, D.C., and Boston. Paul Reichler and Ronald Goodman, each based in Washington, will continue to lead the firm's International Litigation and Arbitration Practice, together with partners Mark Clodfelter, Larry Martin, Andrew Loewenstein, Janis Brennan and others.

Clients of the International Litigation and Arbitration Practice Group also have received counsel on domestic litigation, corporate, environmental and intellectual property matters from other Foley Hoag practices in Boston and Washington. Leurent noted Foley Hoag's leading reputation in international arbitration and its diversified practice portfolio as key reasons for joining the firm.

Foley Hoag represents clients in industries as diverse as technology, energy & renewables, life sciences & health care, investment management and professional services from offices in the Boston area as well as Washington, D.C. For more information, visit www.foleyhoag.com or follow Foley Hoag on Twitter @foleyhoag.

Bruno Leurent, partner, Avocat à la Cour, has represented private companies and sovereign states in a wide range of arbitration matters, including liquefied natural gas procurement contracts, mergers and acquisitions, construction and development contracts, BOT contracts, pre-financing of state oil exports, hotel management contracts, distribution agreements, and military supplies. He also has represented foreign states before French courts in highly publicized and complex litigation involving international law and arbitration, and served as a legal adviser to the Iran-U.S. Claims Tribunal.

Thomas Bevilacqua, partner, Avocat à la Cour, New York Bar, advises clients regarding all aspects of institutional and ad hoc commercial arbitration, from commencement through final enforcement. He has acted as counsel in a number of large investor-state arbitration disputes. He also counsels clients on issues of both civil and common law and has a particular interest in matters of international practice and procedure. He received a B.A. in Mathematics and French from the State University of New York at Albany, and received a J.D. from the Albany Law School of Union University. Bevilacqua also received an LL.M. in French and European Law, mention bien, from the Université Paris I - Panthéon Sorbonne.