Not a Lexis Advance subscriber? Try it out for free.

National Collegiate Athletic Ass'n v. Board of Regents

Supreme Court of the United States

March 20, 1984, Argued ; June 27, 1984, Decided

No. 83-271

Opinion

 [*88]  [***75]  [**2953]    JUSTICE STEVENS delivered the opinion of the Court.

  [****8]  The University of Oklahoma and the University of Georgia contend that the National Collegiate Athletic Association has unreasonably restrained trade in the televising of college football games. After an extended trial, the District Court found that the NCAA had violated § 1 of the Sherman Act 2 and granted  [***76]  injunctive relief. 546 F.Supp. 1276 (WD Okla. 1982). The Court of Appeals agreed that the statute had been violated but modified the remedy in some respects. 707 F.2d 1147 (CA10 1983). We granted certiorari, 464 U.S. 913 (1983), and now affirm.

The NCAA

 [****9]  Since its inception in 1905, the NCAA has played an important role in the regulation of amateur collegiate sports. It has adopted and promulgated playing rules, standards of amateurism, standards for academic eligibility, regulations concerning recruitment of athletes, and rules governing the size of athletic squads and coaching staffs. In some sports, such as baseball,  [**2954]  swimming, basketball, wrestling, and track, it has sponsored and conducted national tournaments. It has not done so in the sport of football, however. With the  [*89]  exception of football, the NCAA has not undertaken any regulation of the televising of athletic events. 3

The NCAA has approximately 850 voting members. The regular members are classified into separate divisions to reflect differences in size and scope of their athletic programs. Division I includes 276 colleges with major athletic programs; in this group only 187 [****10]  play intercollegiate football. Divisions II and III include approximately 500 colleges with less extensive athletic programs. Division I has been subdivided into Divisions I-A and I-AA for football.

Some years ago, five major conferences together with major football-playing independent institutions organized the College Football Association (CFA). The original purpose of the CFA was to promote the interests of major football-playing schools within the NCAA structure. The Universities of Oklahoma and Georgia, respondents in this Court, are members of the CFA.

Read The Full CaseNot a Lexis Advance subscriber? Try it out for free.

Full case includes Shepard's, Headnotes, Legal Analytics from Lex Machina, and more.

468 U.S. 85 *; 104 S. Ct. 2948 **; 82 L. Ed. 2d 70 ***; 1984 U.S. LEXIS 130 ****; 52 U.S.L.W. 4928; 1984-2 Trade Cas. (CCH) P66,139

NATIONAL COLLEGIATE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION v. BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA ET AL.

Prior History:  [****1]  CERTIORARI TO THE UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE TENTH CIRCUIT.

Disposition:  707 F.2d 1147, affirmed.

CORE TERMS

television, games, athletics, football, college football, broadcasters, networks, output, rights, institutions, telecasts, intercollegiate, schools, amateurism, Sherman Act, sports, teams, regulations, attendance, programs, anticompetitive, compete, enhance, appearances, competitors, attractive, antitrust, procompetitive, audience, consumer

Antitrust & Trade Law, Sherman Act, General Overview, Price Fixing & Restraints of Trade, Cartels & Horizontal Restraints, Regulated Industries, Higher Education & Professional Associations, Colleges & Universities, Business & Corporate Law, Nonprofit Corporations & Organizations, Per Se Rule & Rule of Reason, Healthcare Law, Healthcare Litigation, Antitrust Actions, Facilities, Monopolies & Monopolization, Conspiracy to Monopolize, Sherman Act, Communications, Actual Monopolization, Communications Law, Regulated Entities, Broadcasting