Hiring partners reveal new attorney readiness for real-world practice. White Paper

Hiring partners reveal new attorney readiness for real-world practice. White Paper

Law Schools and individual faculty are in the process of revising their curriculum and classes to address the demand for more practice-ready graduates. But what are the most desired research, writing and transactional skills and how can law schools develop these skills most effectively? An independent survey was conducted by 5 Square Research, Inc. and funded by LexisNexis®, to answer these questions and more.

The result is a new white paper, Hiring partners reveal new attorney readiness for real-world practice, which shares the responses of 300 hiring partners and associates from small to large law firms practicing in litigation and transactional law.

Key findings include:

  • 96% believe that newly graduated law students lack practical skills related to litigation and transactional practice.
  • 66% deem writing and drafting skills highly important with emphasis on motions, briefs and pleadings
  • Newer attorneys spend 40% – 60% of their time conducting legal research
  • 88% of hiring partners think proficiency using “paid for” research services is highly important
  • Students lack advanced legal research skills in the areas of statutory law, regulations, legislation and more
  • The most important transactional skills include business and financial concepts, due diligence, drafting contracts and more
  • A law firm spends approximately $19,000 per year, on average, to train a new associate

This study reveals the most important and most lacking practical skills desired by legal employers and will help inform law schools of the specific content and tasks they can integrate into applicable classes and experiential learning programs pursuant to employer demand and the new ABA standards.

Read the full article with charts, Hiring partners reveal new attorney readiness for real-world practice, or view this Executive Overview Prezi*.  

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