Caminetti v. United States

242 U.S. 470, 37 S. Ct. 192 (1917)

 

RULE:

It has long been settled that the transportation of passengers in interstate commerce is within the regulatory power of Congress, under the commerce clause of the Constitution, and the authority of Congress to keep the channels of interstate commerce free from immoral and injurious uses has been frequently sustained, and is no longer open to question.

FACTS:

All three defendants were charged under the White Slavery Act for transporting a woman across state lines for the purpose of debauchery to enable her to become a mistress and concubine. They challenged the judgments of the Circuit Courts of Appeal for the Eighth and Ninth Circuits, which affirmed their convictions under the White Slave Traffic Act of June 25, 1910, 36 Stat. 825.

ISSUE:

Were the convictions proper?

ANSWER:

Yes.

CONCLUSION:

The court held that defendants' convictions were proper. The transportation of women under the age of 18 years in interstate commerce, with the purpose of engaging in debauchery, was within the purview of the Act, even though in none of the cases was it charged or proven that the transportation was for gain or for the purpose of furnishing women for prostitution for hire. The Act was a proper exercise of Congress's power over interstate commerce, and the authority of Congress to keep the channels of interstate commerce free from immoral and injurious uses had been frequently sustained.

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