Secure Communities by the Numbers: An Analysis of Demographics and Due Process

Secure Communities by the Numbers: An Analysis of Demographics and Due Process

"This initial report is the first in a series based on that data. In this report, we attempt to better understand the profile of individuals who have been apprehended through Secure Communities and the process they have encountered as they are funneled through the system. Overall, the findings point to a system in which individuals are pushed through rapidly, without appropriate checks or opportunities to challenge their detention and/or deportation. This conclusion is particularly concerning given that the findings also reveal that people are being apprehended who should never have been placed in immigration custody, and that certain groups are over-represented in our sample population.

Key findings include:

• Approximately 3,600 United States citizens have been arrested by ICE through the Secure Communities program;

• More than one-third (39%) of individuals arrested through Secure Communities report that they have a U.S. citizen spouse or child, meaning that approximately 88,000 families with U.S. citizen members have been impacted by Secure Communities;

• Latinos comprise 93% of individuals arrested through Secure Communities though they only comprise 77% of the undocumented population in the United States;

• Only 52% of individuals arrested through Secure Communities are slated to have a hearing before an immigration judge;

• Only 24% of individuals arrested through Secure Communities and who had immigration hearings had an attorney compared to 40% of all immigration court respondents who have counsel;

• Only 2% of non-citizens arrested through Secure Communities are granted relief from deportation by an immigration judge as compared to 14% of all immigration court respondents who are granted relief;

• A large majority (83%) of people arrested through Secure Communities is placed in ICE detention as compared with an overall DHS immigration detention rate of 62%, and ICE does not appear to be exercising discretion based on its own prioritization system when deciding whether or not to detain an individual.

Warren Institute on Law and Social Policy, Oct. 19, 2011.

Comments

Anonymous
Anonymous
  • 12-08-2011

A critical analysis of the Warren report is available online at: http://cis.org/SC-by-the-numbers-critique-part1