Timoteo Andrade, 100% American

Timoteo Andrade, 100% American

Prof. Michael A. Olivas writes: "I was asked to review Patrick D. Lukens’ book (A Quiet Victory for Latin Rights: FDR and the Controversy Over “Whiteness,” Tucson: University of Arizona University Press, 2012) for the Southwestern Historical Quarterly, a review due this summer, 2012. I will also be participating at a conference at Boston College Law School next year, and am pulling together some case files for a panel on race and immigration law. I wanted to read the underlying case that the Lukens book details, In the matter of Timoteo Andrade, a case of naturalization and whether the Indian-blood Mexican Andrade could qualify for US citizenship in the 1930’s. In his first hearing, in 1935, the family evidence and testimony were that Andrade was “50-75 percent Indian blood.” This was the wrong answer, and the judge turned down his petition. The family recalculated that what he had really meant was “two percent.” Under these new, diluted-blood-quantum facts, he was granted citizenship the following year." - Michael A. Olivas, Apr. 2012.