Official Profiling of Perceived Muslims Persists, Years After 9/11: Cyrus Mehta

Official Profiling of Perceived Muslims Persists, Years After 9/11: Cyrus Mehta

"One would like to think that in 2013, this wholesale profiling against people because of their nationality or religion would have stopped, but a little known program known as Controlled Application Review and Resolution Program or CARRP since 2008 has been targeting some applicants who are Muslim or perceived as Muslim for immigration benefits from Arab, Middle Eastern, Muslim and South Asian communities, resulting in their applications languishing in limbo or being denied for reasons other than merit.  Immigration attorneys have always suspected this all along, but thanks to the ACLU, there is now a damming report that has unearthed the workings of CARRP, which according to the ACLU is code for “Muslims Need Not Apply.” ... While there are still legitimate concerns regarding national security, our government should not be encouraged to use secret programs like CAARP to deny the legitimate and meritorious applications of certain people applying for citizenship, green cards and other benefits for which they are legally eligible.  If there is truly a national security concern, the non-citizen should be charged with removability or inadmissibility under Sections 212(a)(3)(A), (B), and (F), and 237(a)(4)(A) and (B) of the INA.  Moreover, it the government has evidence, it also has the tools to criminally prosecute an individual.  The reason for not doing so is that the government does not have sufficient evidence, and instead, delays or denies the application for an immigration benefit.  Such policies do not in any way prevent terrorism; rather they alienate communities and people who are aspiring to become Americans.  Just like Special Registration turned out to be a colossal failure and waste of government money, CAARP too is heading that way.  The USCIS should cancel this program and ensure that all applications be adjudicated in conformance with existing immigration law, as well as adhere to basic standards of fairness and due process." - Cyrus D. Mehta, Aug. 25, 2013.