Refugee Kids Still Being Fast-Tracked for Deportation

Refugee Kids Still Being Fast-Tracked for Deportation

"As tens of thousands of Central Americans face expedited deportation hearings across the nation, the first wave of cases in New Jersey involving parents and their children began last week in Newark.  A judge informed 18 families who were apprehended in May they would need to return to court with an attorney in early September.  While President Obama in June vowed his administration would ensure "cases are processed fairly and as quickly as possible," the whirlwind pace has surprised and alarmed immigration advocates and attorneys.  They predicted most people would not find an available and affordable attorney within a month when they are scheduled to appear in court again, hindering their ability to make their case that they crossed the border to escape persecution, violence and, in some cases, death.  "Although the court clearly gives them this list of legal providers, I would bet 90 percent are not going to find lawyers.  There are not enough, and the time frame they are giving them is very rushed," said Katie Manton, an attorney with Casa de Esperanza, a nonprofit group in Bound Brook that provides low-cost legal services for immigrant clients.  "It’s a violation of due process." " - Susan K. Livio, Aug. 17, 2014.