LexisNexis® Legal Newsroom
Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP: The National Football League Decides to "Just Do It"

Though the news of Nike's exclusive deal with the NFL broke some time ago, the agreement will officially go into full effect this month and the look of Monday Night Football is about to change. Replacing adidas, this will be the first time that Nike, who was a NFL supplier in the mid-nineties and...

Troutman Sanders LLP: Supreme Court One Step Closer to Question of Whether a Defendant in a Trademark Case can Still Challenge the Mark's Validity after the Plaintiff Agrees to a Covenant Not to Sue

By Megan Rahman The Supreme Court has asked Nike to respond to a cert petition which addresses whether a federal district court is divested of jurisdiction once a defendant in a trademark case promises not to assert its mark against the plaintiff's then-existing commercial activities. On appeal...

Troutman Sanders LLP: District Judge O'Grady Dismisses Fraud, Interference and Antitrust Claims in Patent Suit

By Dabney Carr Erick Cherdak brought claims for patent infringement, patent interference under 35 U.S.C. 291 and antitrust violations against several defendants, including Apple and Nike, based on his patent for an "Athletic Shoe with Timing Device." On motions to dismiss, Judge Liam...

Supreme Court Affirms: Trademark Case Mooted By Covenant Not To Sue

WASHINGTON, D.C. - ( Mealey's ) The Second Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals properly rejected trademark counterclaims levied against Nike Inc. where a covenant not to sue entered into by the counterclaimant extinguished any justiciable controversy between the two, the U.S. Supreme Court held today...

Infringement of Under Armour’s “I Will” Trademark: Did Nike “Just Do It?”

The story goes that Nike's "JUST DO IT" mark originated from the 1977 execution of murderer, Gary Gilmore. Gilmore, who was executed by a Utah firing squad, offered as his final words, "Let's do it." As told in Jonah Lehrer's book, Imagine: How Creativity Works ,...