'Girls Gone Wild' Defamation Lawsuit Involving Spitzer Call Girl Nets $3 Million

'Girls Gone Wild' Defamation Lawsuit Involving Spitzer Call Girl Nets $3 Million

Kids these days. The use of fake IDs by teens is nothing new, but when that ID contains the name of a real person, and the imposter goes on to do naughty things while posing as someone else, the law of defamation can come into play. And if you're inclined to post a YouTube video of that identity thief engaged in acts of questionable moral character, you'd better conduct some due diligence to ensure you don't destroy someone's reputation. That's a lesson that Joe Francis, the entrepreneur behind the risqué "Girls Gone Wild" videos, may have just learned as a result of a $3 million default judgment entered against him earlier this month in New Jersey federal court.

In a complicated scenario typical of the Internet age, in 2008 Francis wanted to take advantage of that year's scandal involving New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer and a prostitute named Ashley Alexandra Dupre. He offered Dupre $1 million to appear in a magazine spread and participate in a promotional tour for "Girls Gone Wild," but withdrew his offer when he found that he already had useful footage of Dupre from five years before, when she was 17 years old.

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