Latest Lawsuit Arising From Libor Scandal Has New York Bank Filing Class Action Against Libor-Setting Banks For Fraud

Latest Lawsuit Arising From Libor Scandal Has New York Bank Filing Class Action Against Libor-Setting Banks For Fraud

In the latest lawsuit to arise from the rapidly evolving Libor scandal, a New York bank has filed a purported class action in the Southern District of New York, seeking to recover damages from the U.S. Dollar Libor rate setting banks for fraud. The complaint, which was filed July 25, 2012 and which can be found here, purports to be filed on behalf of all New York based lending institutions.

The plaintiff in this latest suit is Berkshire Bank, which, according to the Wall Street Journal's July 30. 2012 article about the new lawsuit (here), has eleven branches in New York and New Jersey and about $881 in assets. The bank's complaint purports to be filed on behalf of a class of "all banks, savings & loan institutions, and credit unions headquartered in the State of New York, or with the majority of their operations in the State of New York, that originated loans, purchased whole loans, or purchased interests in loans with interest rated tied to Libor, which rates adjusted at any time between August 1, 2007 and May 31, 2010."

The defendants in the lawsuit include the 16 banks on the panel that set the U.S. dollar London interbank offered rate (Libor) between August 2007 and May 2012. (There are actually 21 named defendants, as multiple related corporate entities have been named as defendants for certain of the Libor setting banks.)

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Read other items of interest from the world of directors & officers liability, with occasional commentary, at the D&O Diary, a blog by Kevin LaCroix.

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