Connecticut Considers Following Federal Lead on Cadmium

Connecticut Considers Following Federal Lead on Cadmium

Four years after adopting a law that limited cadmium content in children’s jewelry to 75 parts per million (ppm) effective July 2014, Connecticut’s legislature is holding a hearing on February 18 to consider a bill [enhanced version available to lexis.com subscribers] that would shift gears and follow the federal government’s lead, using limits based on the migratability of cadmium in case of accidental ingestion.

The proposal, Raised Senate Bill No. 84, would adopt the national voluntary consensus standard on children’s jewelry, known as ASTM F2923-11. That standard was developed in response to an October 2010 paper produced by the staff of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC); the CPSC’s staff there emphatically rejected a flat content limit similar to the one Connecticut adopted. The agency’s staff instead recommended the use of migration tests to establish the level of hazard raised by chronic or acute exposure to cadmium.

he Fashion Jewelry and Accessories Trade Association (FJATA) led the effort to develop the voluntary standard that addressed the risk posed by cadmium, which culminated in the adoption of the children’s jewelry standard in 2011. In 2012, the CPSC’s leadership voted to reject a petition that asked the agency to establish cadmium content limits, explaining that compliance with ASTM F2923-11 would “adequately reduce the risk of harm from exposure to cadmium,” and that the standard set “appropriate limits” and “testing methods” for soluble cadmium. If the Connecticut legislature adopts this bill, the voluntary standard limits would apply to children’s jewelry sold or made in Connecticut as of July 1, 2014, in lieu of the 75 ppm limit that is currently scheduled to go into effect.

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