Business Law in the Blogosphere

Business Law in the Blogosphere

Let’s see what’s happening on some of the Business Law Top Blogs:
 
Over at the Business Associations Blog, Professor Bainbridge has a post on his acceptance speech for UCLA School of Law’s Rutter Award for Excellence in Teaching. The professor used the occasion to criticize the Socratic method and discuss the study of corporate law.
 
Sheppard Mullin of the Corporate and Securities Law Blog has filed a post about recent trends in litigation arising from California’s Song-Beverly Credit Card Act. The Act prohibits retailer from requesting and recording personal information in connection with credit card transactions. Recent suits have been filed over requests for zip codes and for requests for personal information during credit card return transactions.
 
At Corporate Law and Global Economy Steve Diamond writes about his recent article in Dissent on private equity funds. In the article Diamond argues that PE funds are an important part of the institutional changes underway in modern capitalism and that the critique that some in labor and on the left make of PE funds is misconceived.
 
Josh King from corporate tool has a post on the recent Clearwire, Sprint Nextel joint venture. The two companies will combine their wireless broadband units to create a $14.55 billion communications company, also called Clearwire, that will continue developing a mobile network based on WiMax technology. King notes that Clearwire will run the new company despite only owning 27% of the joint venture.
 
On the The Business Law Blog Wesley Deaton has posted part 3 of his series on arbitration. This part is on the right of appeal.  Given the very limited rights of appeal in an arbitration proceeding Deaton cautions that before entering into an agreement for binding arbitration, one should decide whether accurate and correct rulings should be sacrificed to the potentially arbitrary and unappealable ruling of an arbitrator.
 
Finally, at the Small Business Blog, Sharmil McKee discusses age discrimination. McKee advises those who believe they are the target of discrimination to keep a diary of all discriminatory actions, follow company grievance policy to the letter, and file a complaint with the EEOC if company response is unsatisfactory.