LexisNexis® Legal Newsroom
Five Recent Cases You Should Know About (4/26/2010)

Larson’s Spotlight on Marijuana, Retaliatory Discharge, Coughing, Intoxication Defense, and Accidental Injury. Larson's surveys the latest case developments that you need to know about. Thomas A. Robinson, the staff writer for Larson’s Workers’ Compensation Law , has compiled the...

Five Recent Cases You Should Know About (3/18/2011)

Larson's Spotlight on Subsequent Injury, Accidental Injury, Unexplained Injury, Collateral Source, and Defamation Suit . Larson's surveys the latest case developments that you need to know about. Thomas A. Robinson, the staff writer for Larson's Workers' Compensation Law , has compiled...

New Hampshire: Truck Driver Injured When He Fell Asleep Should Recovery Comp Benefits

Quoting Larson’s Workers’ Compensation Law , § 3.03 and relying upon its earlier decision in Appeal of Margeson , 162 N.H. 273, 27 A.3d 663 (2011), the Supreme Court of New Hampshire reversed the state’s Compensation Appeals Board and held that a truck driver’s severe injuries...

Missouri: Sleepy Worker Collects Disability for Breaking Her Ankle

The Commission in a 2-1 opinion affirmed an award of disability of more than $82,000 for a worker who fell because of a sleep disorder caused by working long shifts. Riggins v My Camp , 2015 MO WCLR Lexis 47 (May 14, 2015) An injured worker must show a risk source in order to recover benefits. The...

Virginia: Employee Who Blacked Out While Driving Could Not Establish Workers’ Compensation Claim

A Virginia appellate court affirmed the denial of a workers’ compensation claim filed by an employee, who spent 75 percent of her working time driving in a car provided for her by her employer, and who sustained injuries in a single-car rollover accident resulting in memory loss. The employee testified...

Oregon: Court Clarifies Standards in Idiopathic Fall Cases

While a claimant certainly has the burden of proving compensability by a preponderance of the evidence, an injury that is unexplained and occurs in the course of employment is presumed, as a matter of law, to arise out of the employment. Accordingly, it was error for the Board to require that claim eliminate...