LexisNexis® Legal Newsroom
Five Recent Cases You Should Know About (10/8/2010)

Larson's Spotlight on Medicare Secondary Payer, Increased Risk, Recreational Social Activity, Neutral Risk, and Employment Contract. Larson's surveys the latest case developments that you need to know about. Thomas A. Robinson, the staff writer for Larson's Workers' Compensation Law ...

California Workers' Comp Case Roundup (12/2/2012)

CALIFORNIA COMPENSATION CASES Vol. 77 No. 11 Nov. 2012 A Report of En Banc and Significant Panel Decisions of the WCAB and Selected Court Opinions of Related Interest, With a Digest of WCAB Decisions Denied Judicial Review CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE © Copyright 2012 LexisNexis. All rights reserved...

Florida: Arbitration Clause in Employment Contract Binding in Former Employee’s Retaliatory Discharge Claim

An employment agreement that required arbitration of all employment disputes between a staffing company and a truck driver did not violate public policy by requiring that the driver’s claim of retaliatory discharge be submitted to arbitration, rather than be determined by a court, held a Florida...

North Carolina: Situs of Employment Contract Not Changed by Modification in Another State

In a divided decision, the Supreme Court of North Carolina, quoting Larson’s Workers’ Compensation Law , § 143.03[4], held that once an employment contract has been made—in this case, in South Carolina—the contract’s situs is not changed merely because the contract...

New Jersey: Employment Contract Clause Limiting Statute of Limitations Is Ineffective Against Employee

In a case of first impression, the Supreme Court of New Jersey, reversing a decision by the Superior Court, Appellate Division, held that a clause in an employer’s job application form that required any claim or lawsuit against the employer to be filed no more than six months after the date of...

New Jersey: Court Strikes Down Employment Contract Provision Limiting Employee’s Right to Sue Third Party

A provision in an employment contract that limited an employee’s right to sue a third party for negligence and instead required the injured employee to accept only the benefits that he could recover under the New Jersey Workers’ Compensation Act was against public policy and unenforceable...