LexisNexis® Legal Newsroom
MO: Employers Must Release Videos of Claimants, Sometimes

A court of appeals dramatically changed the rules of discovery regarding surveillance videos in Missouri worker's compensation. A claimant is entitled to a surveillance video even after the Missouri legislature specifically changed the law to state a claimant cannot obtain a video based on...

Montana Lawyers File Lawsuit To Limit Workers’ Compensation Fraud Investigation Information

Gene Jarussi and Michael Eiselein, as well as ten other Montana lawyers, are asking the Montana Supreme Court to issue an injunction to prohibit state workers' compensation investigators from sharing confidential criminal justice information, including surveillance videos, with worker's compensation...

Workers' Comp Fraud Blotter (9/20/2012) – Sharon Stone Pleads Guilty to Workers Comp Fraud After Faking Her Age By 30 Years

Each week we'll be surveying what the media, state agencies, insurance companies, and others report in terms of workers' comp fraud. Just like a police blotter, our workers' comp fraud blotter lists recent arrests, charges, convictions and investigations. Workers' Comp Fraud Blotter...

Larson’s Spotlight on Recent Cases: Video Evidence Not Disqualified for Three-Second Gap

Larson's Spotlight on Videotape Evidence, Going and Coming Rule, PTSD, and Foot Injury. Larson's surveys the latest case developments that you need to know about. Thomas A. Robinson, the staff writer for Larson's Workers' Compensation Law , has compiled the list below. NC: Three...

New York: Videotape of Claimant’s Activities Leads to Disqualification from Benefits

A New York appellate court affirmed a finding by the state’s Workers’ Compensation Board that claimant violated N.Y. Workers’ Comp. Law § 114-a by misrepresenting her work activity while receiving benefits. At a hearing, claimant testified that she had not worked for anyone in...

New York: Claimant’s Motorcycle Riding Disqualifies Him From Benefits

The Board was justified in finding claimant had violated N.Y. Work. Comp. Law § 114-a and should be disqualified from receiving wage replacement benefits where the claimant represented to an orthopedic surgeon that he could not do anything more than sedentary activity, and then only with the use...