Environmental

Recent Posts

Seaweed and licorice may help improve the immune system of swine, decreasing the need for antibiotics
Posted on 6 Jun 2011 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

As noted in prior posts, antibiotics are used not only to treat disease in animals, but also to prevent disease and to stimulate growth. Unfortunately, but not surprisingly, the use of antibiotics in animal husbandry has lead to the rapid development... Read More

Did Gulf surface bacteria not find Deepwater Horizon oil to be a complete diet?
Posted on 7 Aug 2011 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

Prior posts have discussed various aspects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and its impact on the biota of the Gulf. Bioremediation has several goals. First, one uses nature to remediate contamination, saving significant sums. Second, the "food"... Read More

Stress May Increase Inflammation and the Diseases Associated Therewith
Posted on 28 May 2012 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

Prior posts have noted that for toxic torts causation is the central focus, and that it is very difficult to prove. Prior posts have also noted that the makeup of the bacteria in one's GI tract can have a major influence on generating inflammation;... Read More

Can antibiotics interfere with the body's ability to fight viruses? Perhaps so.
Posted on 20 May 2011 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

Prior posts have noted that abuse and misuse of antibiotics in people and animals has lead to an increase in antibiotic resistant organisms, to the detriment of human health. Prior posts have also noted the importance of bacteria to human health and welfare... Read More

Coriander oil is found to kill E. Coli, Salmonella, & MRSA
Posted on 30 Aug 2011 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

Prior posts have noted the adverse environmental effects that are being seen with some bactericides. Prior posts have also noted the wide variety of substances that can act as selection factors affecting the evolution of various organisms. Researchers... Read More

Another reason to control erosion and nutrient runoff -- Cholera
Posted on 31 Aug 2011 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

Numerous prior posts have followed the growing understanding of what factors drive the Gulf of Mexico dead zone. It pretty much comes down to nutrient runoff into the Mississippi River and its tributaries (e.g., sewage, feedlots, agricultural fertilizers... Read More

Intestinal bacteria may trigger multiple sclerosis
Posted on 21 Jan 2012 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

Physicians have not identified the cause of multiple sclerosis. Theses include an individual's genetics, environment, and possibly a virus. In such an environment, all types of theories can be thrown up and become the basis for litigation, not unlike... Read More

Eating yogurt without more does not produce lasting changes in the mix of bacteria in the GI tract
Posted on 13 Feb 2012 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

Prior posts have noted the impact of GI bacteria on human health, from their potential to prevent a variety of diseases to perhaps being the cause of other afflictions. In what has been referred to as an elegant study, researchers undertook human and... Read More

More Studies are Focusing on the Types of Bacteria that are Part of all Humans
Posted on 20 Jun 2012 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

Prior posts have noted that a) for every 1 human cell there are 10 bacteria in or on our bodies; b) these bacteria are key to the digestion of our food, production of necessary nutrients, and disease prevention; c) the nature of our diet influences the... Read More

As Much as 1/3 of Earth's Biomass Lives Beneath the Ocean Floor
Posted on 28 May 2012 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

They are referred to as intraterrestrials, organisms that live inside the Earth. Most live beneath the bottom of the oceans. Some live in the tens of meters of mud just beneath the seafloors; others, following fractures in rock, live hundreds of meters... Read More

Colony collapse disorder, has the answer finally been found? Possibly
Posted on 4 Feb 2012 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

Prior posts have discussed the various research done and theories put forth related to colony collapse disorder (see Colony Collapse Disorder for an overview). The range of potential causes includes pesticides, global warming, disease, and habitat destruction... Read More

Study warns of potential increase in global mercury emissions, which would impact animals in Arctic region
Posted on 15 May 2011 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

An assessment by a scientific body set up by the eight Arctic rim countries has projected that global mercury emissions could grow by 25% by 2020 if no action is taken to control such emissions, posing a threat to polar bears, whales, and seals and the... Read More

Coyotes May Be Indirectly Responsible for Spreading Lyme Disease
Posted on 25 Jun 2012 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

Deer often are blamed for the spread of tick-borne Lyme disease; many local programs focus on deer populations as a method to control Lyme disease. A new thesis suggests these programs are not targeting the actual driving force, coyotes. Researchers note... Read More

Coriander oil is found to kill E. Coli, Salmonella, & MRSA
Posted on 30 Aug 2011 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

Prior posts have noted the adverse environmental effects that are being seen with some bactericides. Prior posts have also noted the wide variety of substances that can act as selection factors affecting the evolution of various organisms. Researchers... Read More

Colony collapse disorder, has the answer finally been found? Possibly
Posted on 4 Feb 2012 by Thomas H. Clarke, Jr.

Prior posts have discussed the various research done and theories put forth related to colony collapse disorder (see Colony Collapse Disorder for an overview). The range of potential causes includes pesticides, global warming, disease, and habitat destruction... Read More