Home – Politics in Brief - March 11 2019

Politics in Brief - March 11 2019

REPUBLICAN WON’T RUN IN NC CONGRESSIONAL RACE DO-OVER

Republican Mark Harris said last week he will not run in NORTH CAROLINA’s new election for the 9th Congressional District due to health concerns. The GOP candidate in that race will instead be Union County Commissioner Stony Rushing. The new election was ordered after a months-long investigation into allegations of ballot tampering in last year’s race by a political operative working for the Harris campaign. (HILL)

 

NC JUDGE STRIKES DOWN VOTER APPROVED CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS

Wake County Superior Court Judge G. Bryan Collins has thrown out two amendments to NORTH CAROLINA’s Constitution approved by voters in November, implementing a voter ID requirement and capping the state income tax rate. The judge ruled that the state’s General Assembly was so gerrymandered that it “does not represent the people of North Carolina and is therefore not empowered to pass legislation that would amend the state’s constitution.” (NEWS & OBSERVER [RALEIGH])

 

SD VULNERABLE TO VOTER FRAUD

Lax residency requirements and voter registration enforcement in SOUTH DAKOTA may be leaving the state open to voter fraud and election tampering. About 6,300 voters are registered at a single rural address in Pennington County, and about 1,400 people are registered at a business address in Hanson County. (ARGUS LEADER)

 

KY CONSIDERING LIMITING PUBLIC RECORDS ACCESS

KENTUCKY lawmakers are considering a bill (HB 387) that, as amended, would bar nonresidents from obtaining public documents. Only a handful of states, including Arkansas and Tennessee, limit public records access to residents. (LOUISVILLE COURIER JOURNAL, LEXISNEXIS STATE NET)

 

HI LOOKING TO BOOST VOTER TURNOUT

HAWAII lawmakers are considering several bills aimed at boosting voter turnout. The House has passed automatic voter registration and voting by mail measures, as well as legislation requiring automatic recounts in close races. The Senate has also passed voting by mail and automatic recount bills. (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

 

VOTING MACHINE BILL SPEEDING THROUGH GA GENERAL ASSEMBLY

The GEORGIA House passed a bill (HB 316) late last month providing for the replacement of the state’s 27,000 existing electronic voting machines with a $150 million touchscreen voting system that prints paper ballots that can be used to verify accuracy. The fast-moving bill is now in the Senate. (ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION, LEXISNEXIS STATE NET)

 

JUDGE HALTS TX VOTER PURGE

U.S. District Judge Fred Biery ordered officials in 18 TEXAS counties named as defendants in a lawsuit challenging the state’s effort to identify ineligible voters not to remove any names from the voter rolls without his approval, saying the state’s effort was “inherently paved with flawed results.” The judge also ordered acting Texas Secretary of State David Whitley to direct officials in the state’s other 254 counties not to remove any voters without court approval. (NBC NEWS)

 

AZ AG SAYS PUBLIC OFFICIALS ILLEGALLY OPPOSED BALLOT MEASURE

An investigation by the ARIZONA Attorney General’s Office found that 28 public officials in the state, including utility regulator Andy Tobin, violated state law by opposing a clean-energy initiative (Proposition 127) on the ballot last year, which ended up not passing. But although three state laws barring the use of public resources to influence the outcome of elections provide for fines of up to $5,000, the AG’s office offered the officials the opportunity to settle for $225 apiece. (ARIZONA REPUBLIC [PHOENIX])

 

-- Compiled by KOREY CLARK